Is Calgary at the forefront of a political and social change?

UBC Dialogues: Calgary

Is Calgary at the forefront of a political and social change?

A spirit of change is in the air in the Heart of the New West. Only months after electing the nation’s first Muslim large-city mayor, Calgary has now offered up Alberta’s first female premier. Beyond its notable economic success, there has been a lot of discussion recently about the city’s increasing diversity, underappreciated cultural scene and emerging progressive values. A recent study even suggested its people hold similar views to their Canadian brethren on hot button issues such as abortion, same-sex marriage, and even gun control.

Is Calgary truly embracing the progressive in PC, or is all this talk of change much ado about nothing? Would moving in a new direction mean abandoning traditional community values? What does the future hold for Calgary?

On February 6, 2012, we held a provocative dialogue on political and social change in Calgary, at Endeavor Arts.

Podcast

Moderator

Professor Stephen Toope, President and Vice Chancellor, UBC

Panelists

Dr. Doug Owram, Deputy Vice Chancellor and Principal, UBC Okanagan

Dr. Allan Tupper, Professor and Department Head, UBC Department of Political Science

Adam Legge, BCom’97, President and CEO, Calgary Chamber of Commerce

Kathleen E. Mahoney, LLB’76, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Calgary

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2 thoughts on “Is Calgary at the forefront of a political and social change?

  1. Pingback: Events and Notices « Trek Magazine – Online

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